Justia Mississippi Supreme Court Opinion Summaries

Articles Posted in Mississippi Supreme Court

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Justin Stewart appealed his convictions of armed robbery and felon in possession of a firearm. Stewart argued that the trial court improperly enhanced his sentence, in violation of his rights against double jeopardy, and erred in denying his motion to suppress out-of-court and in-court identifications. Finding no error, the Supreme Court affirmed. View "Stewart v. Mississippi" on Justia Law

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Jeffrey Hill was indicted by a grand jury of possession of a firearm on educational property (the campus of Mississippi State University). In two jury trials, Hill represented himself with the assistance and advice of court-appointed counsel. Hill's first trial resulted in a hung jury. Hill was found guilty of the indicted offense in his second trial and was sentenced to three years in the custody of the Mississippi Department of Corrections (MDOC) and ordered to pay a fine. The trial court denied Hill's post-trial motion for a new trial or, in the alternative, judgment notwithstanding the verdict (JNOV). On appeal to the Supreme Court, Hill challenged his conviction, arguing: (1) his right to counsel and a fair trial under the Sixth Amendment was violated when the trial court refused to allow Hill's court-appointed counsel to withdraw; and (2) the trial court erred when it failed to grant Hill's motion for a new trial on the ground that the verdict was against the overwhelming weight of the evidence. Finding error with regard to the first issue, the Supreme Court reversed Hill’s conviction and remanded the case to the trial court for a new trial. The Court declined to address the second issue. View "Hill v. Mississippi" on Justia Law

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Jason Lee Keller appealed his conviction for capital murder stemming from the death of Hat Thi Nguyen. After careful consideration of the trial court record, the Supreme Court found no reversible error and affirmed. View "Keller v. Mississippi" on Justia Law

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James Ferguson challenged the sufficiency of the evidence presented against him at trial. He was convicted on aggravated-assault charges. Furthermore, Ferguson argued he received ineffective assistance of trial counsel. Finding no reversible error, the Supreme Court affirmed his convictions. View "Ferguson v. Mississippi" on Justia Law

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The Board of Aldermen for the City of Ridgeland denied Baymeadows, LLC's proposed repair plans to correct 1,478 cited code violations, and Baymeadows appealed. Upon review of the Board's decision, the Supreme Court held that the Board did not adequately state its rationale for denying the proposed plans. Therefore, the Court remanded the case back to the Board either to issue Baymeadows a permit or provide an appropriate factual basis for its denial. View "Baymeadows, LLC v. City of Ridgeland" on Justia Law

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Two Winona police officers obtained an arrest warrant for defendant Joel Baskin for aggravated assault. Upon searching defendant, officers found cocaine, which lead to an indictment for possession of cocaine. This case turned entirely on whether the jury believed defendant’s witnesses’ testimony. The Supreme Court found that the trial judge clearly erred by allowing the State to impeach a key defense witness with a petty larceny conviction. Accordingly, the Court reversed the trial court and remanded this case for a new trial. View "Baskin v. Mississippi" on Justia Law

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In 2007, Plaintiff Chris Snopek proposed working on the concept of a multi-use sports complex to be built on land in Madison. The parties collaborated over the designs and plans for the complex, and entered into a letter of intent. The letter of intent expired, but Snopek alleged that the parties continued to move forward with the project. Years later, Snopek contacted D1 TN, a Tennessee company, with regard to working on the project. Snopek introduced D1 TN to St. Dominic. In late 2011, D1 TN published its collaboration with D1 TN in the building of the facility in Madison, with no mention of Snopek (or his companies, Joshua Properties, LLC and Performance Sports Academy, LLC). Snopek filed suit against St. Dominic, D1 TN, alleging breach of fiduciary duties, misappropriation of trade secrets, tortious interference with prospective advantage, unfair competition, civil conspiracy and usurpation of business opportunity. On interlocutory appeal to the Supreme Court, Snopek argued the trial court erred in dismissing D1 TN for lack of personal jurisdiction. Finding that personal jurisdiction existed over D1 TN, the Supreme Court reversed the trial court’s order. View "Joshua Properties, LLC v. D1 Sports Holdings, LLC" on Justia Law

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The Workers' Compensation Commission dismissed applicant Matthew Ladner's petition to controvert and motion for payment of benefits because it found the statute of limitations had expired. Ladner appealed that decision to the Supreme Court. Upon review, the Supreme Court reversed the Commission's decision. View "Ladner v. Zachry Construction" on Justia Law

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Ralph Smith, Jr. appealed the circuit court's decision to deny his habeas corpus petition. After review of the habeas court's record and Smith's petition, the Supreme Court concluded Smith was not entitled to habeas relief. Therefore the Court affirmed the denial of Smith's petition. View "Smith, Jr. v. Banks" on Justia Law

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Riverbend Utilities, Inc. challenged the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Permit Board’s decision to grant tow groundwater withdrawal permits to the Harrison County Utility Authority. Finding no reversible error, the Supreme Court affirmed the Department’s decision. View "Riverbend Utilities, Inc. v. Mississippi Environmental Quality Permit Board" on Justia Law